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Math Resources:
Integrating Podcasts, Vodcasts and Whiteboards into Teaching and LearningShowing Grade 1 Boy with A+ ScoreMath resources concepts Gif

 

Our collection of Math Resources has multiple pages designed for teaching within specific grade bands.  You'll also find valuable collections of support and enrichment resources that will benefit all learners.

Math Resources (Page 1): Elementary and Middle Levels: Basic Mathematics and Skills Development, plus apps for mobile devices

Math Resources (Page 2): Middle, Secondary, Post-Secondary Subject Specific Resources, including apps for mobile devices: Algebra and Pre-Algebra, Geometry, Statistics, Probability, Trigonometry, Precalculus and Calculus

Math Resources (Page 3): K-12 Supplementary Collections: Miscellaneous Math Collections; Practical Applications--Math in Careers, Daily Life, and Across the Curriculum; and Problem Solving

Math Resources (Page 4): Enrichment and Extra Help: Math Contests, Competitions, Challenges, and Camps; Study Skills and Homework Help, plus tips for parent involvement; and Dictionaries, Glossaries, Reference Sheets, and Math Encyclopedias

Math Resources (Page 5): Lesson Plans and Worksheets, Design and Manage Your Own Lesson Plans, and Publishers' Textbook Support Sites

Arrow: You are hereMath Resources (Page 6): The current page has subsections:

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Math Resources (Page 6)

Podcast and Vodcast Resources--Videos for Instruction

 

 

Use podcasts and vodcasts to appeal to visual and auditory learners and to enhance your own learning.

Play video Friendly reminder GifThere's really no excuse for an educator to skip teaching a math concept with which you might not feel comfortable.  And even if you have all the expertise you need, your learners will benefit from videos for review and as their own tutorials.  We're in an era of learning on-demand.  Thus, learners can no longer use an excuse of not knowing how to do a problem because they missed a class, or did not take good notes, or did not understand a lesson.  The internet is filled with resources for teaching and learning mathematics at all levels, which also enable learners to be exposed to multiple perspectives on a concept.  So, consider using videos in instruction from trusted sources.

Read the two-part series on podcasts by Patricia Deubel, published in T.H.E. Journal:

 

Annenberg Learner: The section "Video Series" includes programs for mathematics instruction benefiting teachers and their learners.  For example, the following are for high school learners and above:

Brightstorm.com has over 2000 online video lessons appropriate for middle and high school students.  The math lessons are free and developed by a group of math teachers for algebra 1, geometry, algebra 2, trigonometry, precalculus and calculus.  Additionally, the site offers a fee-based service to prepare for the SAT, ACT, and advanced placement courses.

Discovery Education has a series of video tutorials that help young learners to master basic skills with number and number operations related to addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.  These how to's are a free collection, great for classroom use and at-home reinforcement.  Note: Discovery Education has an entire subscription-based video collection.

ASCD EduCore logo EduCore Math Tools from ASCD is a free resource that "features formative assessment lessons and instructional videos for mathematics aligned to the Common Core."  Classroom challenges (formative assessment lessons developed by the Mathematics Assessment Project) are provided for middle and high school, concept development, problem solving, and include supplemental and related resources.  ASCD's Common Core Resource Collections on iTunes include math for each K-8 grade, Algebra 1, Algebra 2, and Geometry.  Each collection is intended to give you lesson and activity ideas; suggested books, apps, and web content; instructional content and assessment information; and sample assessment items from PARCC and SBAC to help meet the goals of the CCSS.  Most math resources within each collection are free.

Glean collects video lessons from multiple sources and arranges them within topics.  Math subjects include algebra 1, geometry, algebra 2, and calculus.  There are also science videos.

Just Math Tutorials by math teacher PatrickJMT contains an extensive collection of his videos primarily for algebra, trigonometry, and calculus.  They are free to use and are suitable for high school and above.  There is also a section on miscellaneous topics such as probability and statistics, SAT test prep and the advanced placement AB and BC calculus test prep levels.

Khan Academy IconKhan Academy features K-12 video tutorials.  Math videos are categorized by arithmetic and pre-algebra, algebra, geometry, trigonometry and precalculus, calculus, statistics and probability, differential equations, linear algebra, applied math, and recreational math.  Many of Khan Academy videos can also be found on YouTube for Schools.

Knowmia features a library of over 30,000 video lessons created by teachers.  If you browse mathematics, you'll find videos categorized by subject area to begin further exploration.

Mathcasts are short screencasts that any student can use to learn and review math.  Mathcasts are organized by strands within grades 4-7 and topics within subjects: algebra, geometry, functions, probability and statistics, calculus, linear algebra, geometry 3D, financial math, and vector calculus.  Additional resources about mathcasts are provided.

MathFLIX from Loyola University Chicago School of Education is a real find.  It has 1000 free "instructional math movies covering a wide range of math concepts including Number & Operations, Algebra, Measurement, Geometry, Data Analysis & Probability, Connections and Technology. In addition to MathFLIX’s valuable video resources, the site also features 400 downloadable worksheets that reinforce concepts and provide valuable practice."  Each movie is from 4-7 minutes long.

Mathispower4u by James Sousa contains a collection of over 4000 mini-lessons and videos organized by course and topic: number sense, arithmetic/prealgebra, algebra 1, algebra 2, geometry, math for liberal arts, trigonometry, calculus 1, calculus 2, calculus 3, linear algebra, differential equations.  The site also includes problem solving activities with video solutions.  Multiple Common Core topics are addressed in these.

MathVids.com, which is presented and created by SchoolVids, LLC, assembles math video resources from a variety of different teachers to allow students to learn a math topic from a teacher they are able to understand.  Content is for middle, high school, and college level mathematics and organized by subject area.  The developers aim to make these videos easily accessible and well organized for students to watch. The videos have been submitted by hundreds of different math teachers. Many of the videos have been produced by SchoolVids and are exclusive to the website. All videos on the MathVids.com website have been uploaded with written permission from the author of the video.

Math Live from Alberta Education (Canada) contains 23 animated math tutorials organized within four strands: numbers, patterns and relations, shape and space, and statistics and probability.  These can be used to address Common Core Standards for grades 4-6.  Each episode includes parent notes, teacher notes, a student activity sheet and assessment.  A glossary with visual illustrations is also provided.

Man Behind Studio Camera GifMath TV problem solving videos are available for basic math, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and calculus.

HOT! Media4Math is by Emmy Award winning Edward De Leon.  You'll find several sections of media, such as Math in the News, a video gallery of tutorials for algebra and geometry, TI-Nspire mini tutorials, Math Labs, Math Solvers, print resources, and more.  Highly recommended!  Note: Media4Math--Math in the News is of particular interest: "Current events, as seen through the prism of mathematics: This is what "Math in the News" brings every week. We look through stories that make today's headlines and extract the mathematical story underlying it."  This is a great find!

MIT BLOSSOMS features a video library with over 100 free math and science lessons primarily for high school students.  "Every lesson is a complete resource that includes video segments, a teacher’s guide, downloadable hand-outs and a list of additional online resources relevant to the topic. Each 50-minute lesson builds on math and science fundamentals by relating abstract concepts to the real world. The lessons intersperse video instruction with planned exercises that engage students in problem solving and critical thinking" (About Us section).  This site is an initiative of MIT's Learning International Networks Consortium.  All lessons are mapped to both the Common Core State Standards and the Next Generation Science Standards.

NeoK12.com has gathered a series of math videos from the web, which are organized by numbers, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, algebra, statistics, probability, and trigonometry.  All have been reviewed by K-12 teachers.

OpenEd logo OpenEd contains an extensive collection of videos aligned to the Common Core math standards and other standards.  To find video resources, select the group of standards, a category, and then standard.  You can also filter by K-12 grade level.  OpenEd also has a free app, Common Core Quest, for iPad and iPhone.  It contains SBAC and PARCC style questions within quizzes covering math and language arts standards for grades 6 and up with some coverage of the elementary standards.  Among resources, are "lesson plans aligned to most of the popular textbooks in the USA.  They are paced by chapter, and include videos, formative assessments, homework assignments, games for the exact chapter of the textbook" that educators are teaching.

PBS LearningMedia has over 600 resources for teaching mathematics using videos and interactives for grades preK-12.  These can also be used on interactive whiteboards.  Some videos also provide teaching methods for professional development.

SchoolTube contains numerous videos on mathematics in their category of academics and education, which would help learners review concepts presented in class and in some cases offer a different instruction perspective. "SchoolTube provides students and educators a safe, world class, and FREE media sharing website that is nationally endorsed by premier education associations."

Stuffed Sheets.com has several pod and anicasts.  They are developing tutorials in Developmental Math (Arithmetic), Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Precalculus, and Calculus (subjects not necessarily in order).  For example, play their pod and anicasts on the Sieve of Eratosthenes, fractions and mixed numbers and their operations.

TeacherTube.com contains numerous short video clips on math topics, which might be used to supplement classroom instruction or for topic tutorials.

TenMarks has aligned their content to the Common Core standards.  There is a comprehensive library of math video lessons that teachers can use for free.  TenMarks Math Practice Program is also free for teachers to use in class or for their students to use at home. K-12 students are provided a variety of problems on each topic, and hints if they need them, and immediate video lessons to refresh and learn the topic.  Teachers can choose their own curriculum, assign work to students, have it automatically graded immediately, and review individual and class performance.  TenMarks includes standards and grade-specific assessments modeled after SBAC and PARCC questions to help learners with mastery of the Common Core standards.  There's a databank of over 20,000 questions that include constructed response (fill-ins), multi-part constructed response, multiple choice, multi-part multiple choice, select all that apply, and multi-part combination items.  A premium version is available for a fee and provides diagnostic assessments at the standard and grade levels.

Thinking Mathematics by James Tanton has a series of videos on numerous concepts for high school math and beyond.  Among categories are algebra, arithmetic, calculus, geometry, miscellaneous, numbers, precalculus, permutations and combinations, Pythagorean theorem, quadratics, statistics, probability, and trigonometry.

WatchKnowLearn.org contains a database of free educational videos organized for kids, so that they can get extra "instant tutoring" on almost any topic taught when they need it.  There are multiple content areas, including about 1000 videos in mathematics, and over 100 on standardized test skills and math study skills.  Videos are gathered from across the internet and are previewed by a team of professionals.  Teachers will find the database helpful, too, to get new ideas on how to approach material and videos can be used in their classrooms.  Highly recommended site!

Worldwide Center of Mathematics has videos to accompany full courses in precalculus, differential and integral calculus, multivariable calculus, AP calculus, AP statistics.  Videos are recorded in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

YouTube Education: While YouTube is controversial and some schools ban its use, the content at YouTube Education would be appropriate, as videos pertain to specific content areas.  Note: YouTube can be used in "Safety Mode" to help "hide inappropriate content flagged by users and other signals."  This feature is located at the bottom of video pages and can be turned on/off simply by clicking either choice and then saving your preference for the browser you are using.  Even if your school bans YouTube, there are still ways to use YouTube videos with the following resources:

Educators who wish to use YouTube should also learn more about copyright of YouTube videos and Creative Commons licenses, which "provide a standard way for content creators to grant someone else permission to use their work."  Educators might also appreciate YouTube Teachers, a dedicated channel, which is "for educators everywhere to learn how to use YouTube as an educational tool. There are lesson plan suggestions, highlights of great educational content on YouTube, and training on how to film your own educational videos" (Profile: About me section).

Virtual Nerd from Pearson Education, Inc. is an online, self-guided video tutorial site for math.  There are over 1,500 video lessons covering grades 6-8 math, pre-Algebra, Algebra I, Algebra 2, and Geometry.  Pearson has made these videos available for free.  You'll also find alignments to Common Core, SAT Math topics, and ACT Math topics.

 

Are you considering or using the flipped classroom model?

Flipped Learning for Math Instruction by Bergmann & Sams

What is it?

Flipped Learning (2014) is advocated by Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams.  In this model, teachers often incorporate videos, self-made or made my others, that students view outside of class.  Typically, "flipped" means that what was traditionally presented in class (e.g., the lecture) is now viewed on the video at home, and what was traditionally assigned for homework (e.g., problem sets in math) is now done during class time.

Bergmann and Sams elaborated on the model in relation to math in Flipped Learning for Math Instruction.  Each chapter provides "practical guidance, including how to approach lesson planning, what to do with class time and how the flipped model can work alongside learning through inquiry" (Description online).

How does it work?

Read Flipping for Beginners (Saltman, 2011) for how a typical two-day cycle of instruction might work when using this instructional strategy.  On Day 1 learners explore content and are introduced to new concepts via an activity that builds on prior knowledge.  They view instructional video that night for homework, which replaces the direct instruction of a traditional in-class lecture.  The video may or may not involve interactivity.  They might complete a reflective activity as proof of viewing the video.  On Day 2, discussion ensues so that they get their additional questions answered.  During class learners then engage in activities for applying their knowledge, working on problem sets from learning packets and may then complete those for day 2 homework and preparing for a quiz the following day.

See the five Videos About Flipped Learning from Bergmann & Sams.

What's to be gained?

A quick answer is that a flipped classroom model has the potential to enable learners to have more class time to interact with their teacher (the content expert) for enhancing achievement.  Kelly Walsh (2013) noted that a flipped classroom offers greater opportunities for active learning, if implemented correctly.  Such active learning comes in many forms such as experiential, project-based, problem-based, and inquiry-based learning.  Flipped instruction has a relationship to implementing constructivist learning theory and supports mastery learning owing to greater opportunities for differentiation and personalization of learning.

What should you consider before implementation?

There are several considerations before making a decision to use this method, however.  Ben Stern (2012) posed Five Questions to Ask Before Flipping a Lesson:

  1. Why am I lecturing?
  2. What are students doing while watching the lecture?
  3. Would I watch this?
  4. Why do the kids need to understand this idea or skill?
  5. What will we do in class that will take advantage of being together and also make use of the previous night's lecture?

Prior to using this method, survey learners to find out if all of them have access to technology when they are at home.  If not, you will need to provide opportunities at the school for learners to view videos before, during, or after school hours.

You need to determine how you will know that all learners viewed videos before classtime.  You might provide a worksheet with a list of guiding questions for them to answer while viewing the video, or a few math problems to complete related to content within the video, and a place on the worksheet for them to jot down questions they might still have.

You'll need to decide if you have time and skills to create your own videos or will use videos created by others.  If the latter, you'll need to preview that content to ensure quality.

Mathematics educators who decide to use the flipped model or who are contemplating using it might also consider the viewpoint of Linda M. Gojak (2012), a former NCTM President, in which she stated the following:

Although the flipped classroom may be promising, the question is not whether to flip, but rather how to apply the elements of effective instruction to teach students both deep conceptual understanding and procedural fluency. Flipped lessons that simply demonstrate how to do a procedure do not encourage understanding, do not ensure that students will remember the procedure, and do not promote adaptive reasoning. A single instructional approach is unlikely to have a major impact on student achievement once the novelty wears off. A combination of well-thought-out strategies that consider student needs, incorporate the characteristics of effective instruction, and develop understanding of mathematical concepts will have the greatest impact on student achievement. (para. 6)

Read Patricia Deubel's article, Is it really hip to flip?, published in THE Journal, January 16, 2013.

Resources

Free iconEDpuzzle is a completely free tool for educators to use with any video.  It's ideal for flipped learning.  One concern educators have is whether or not learners view the videos.  EDpuzzle solved this as the tool allows you to embed quizzes or questions with immediate feedback within a video to check for understanding and to track progress.  You can add audio notes to any video, crop videos, find videos (e.g. from Khan Academy, YouTube, LearnZillion, and others), or upload your own videos to the site.

PlayPosit logoPlayPosit (formerly eduCanon) "is an online learning environment to create and share interactive video lessons. Teachers begin with any online video (screencasts, Khan Academy, TED, etc.) and transform what is traditionally passive content into an active experience for students, with time-embedded activities." (What We Do section).  This site works well with flipped learning as a way to ensure learners interact with video content.  Features such as multiple choice, free response, reflective pause, and answer feedback can be used.

Where will you store your videos for easy access by your learners?

Many sites exist for storing media online.  Teachers must ensure, however, that the site is approved for use by learners and not blocked.

Flipasaurus was developed by teachers for teachers to store their flipped classroom videos in a private library under teacher control for who can access content.  Videos can be made available for learners to play on any devices, including iPod, iPad, Android.  In addition to uploading videos, teachers can upload audio, images, PDF, and Office documents.  Of value is an ability to share media "using Quicklinks, Embeds, QR Codes, or even Podcasts. Mark important sections of videos using Chapters."  Podcasts "make it simple to solve real problems such as lack of Internet access in the home."

Do you remain a skeptic about flipped learning or need to learn more?

In his series of posts on "Flipped Learning Skepticism," Dr. Robert Talbert, who writes in the blog Casting Out Nines, addresses questions such as: Is flipped learning just self-teaching?  Can students really learn on their own?  Do students really want to have lectures?  Reader responses provide additional food for thought on using this method.  The theme of this blog is "Where mathematics, technology and education cross."

Flipped Learning Network is an additional resource for professional development opportunities, and gaining knowledge, skills, and resources for flipped learning.

Flipped Learning Global Initiative: "FLBI is focused on identifying and developing strategic partnerships, initiatives, projects, best in class vendors, products, and services to introduce and support flipped learning around the globe."  You'll find articles on best practices, research on flipped learning, master teachers who share their experiences, and hear what's happening in other countries.

 

 

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Whiteboard Tips and Resources

 

When using a whiteboard or a projector, consider the following tips suggested by the Innovative Educator (2010):

Do you have a whiteboard?  If so, these next are great resources for you:

DreamBox Learning has over 40 free virtual manipulatives for K-8 math available on its website that can also be used with any whiteboard.  They help learners engage with number sense, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, geometry, algebra, functions, and proportional reasoning concepts.

FluidMath IconFluidMath from Fluidity Software is a teaching and learning tool for Pen-Centric platforms, including Tablet PCs and interactive whiteboards. While not free, its capabilities will enable you to use your own handwriting (very convenient for entering math symbols) to create, solve, graph and automatically animate math and physics problems.  These resulting dynamic instructional materials will help learners to explore and better understand concepts.

Harvey's Homepage: Interactive SMART board lessons for mathematicsHarvey's Homepage: Interactive SMART board lessons for mathematics.  These are so engaging for learners and colorful.  Download the notebooks of lessons, which were developed by Harvey Almarode (James Madison University). Topics include number sense, computation/estimation, patterns/algebra/functions, geometry, measurement, probability/statistics, teacher utilities, problems of the day, and more.

MisterTeacher.com: Jamie Tubbs has developed a series of math mini-movies for use with SMART boards.  These are primarily for elementary and middle school learners.  Topics include Alphabet Geometry (angles, parallel lines, similar figures, symmetry, tesselations, transformations), Everything Geometry, Web-Based Student Activities, Number Properties & Concepts, Multiplication with Circles and Stars, Addition and Subtractions with Dominoes, and More Grades K-2 (doubles and recognizing patterns).  You'll also find virtual manipulatives.  There's also content for science and social studies.

Promethean Planet, an enhanced site released June 2010, is filled with whiteboard resources.  It is supported in 11 languages, and the boards are sold worldwide.

SMART Exchange has a range of lesson plans in multiple subjects.  Note: SMART Technologies introduced a SMART Notebook app for iPad.  At $6.99 in iTunes, it "enables students to open their own version of a SMART Notebook lesson on their iPad and take it with them, wherever they go. Now students can work with the same SMART Notebook file – individually on their iPad and then collaboratively in class on the SMART Board interactive whiteboard" (Product description).

TeacherLED Interactive Whiteboard Resources for math includes interactives categorized for algebra, data handling, number; shape, space & measure; general maths, and investigations.  Even without the whiteboard, you can investigate these online using your computer.

TI-SmartView emulator software for the TI-84 Plus Family of graphing calculators from Texas Instruments allows educators to project interactive representations on their existing projection systems or interactive whiteboards.

Topmarks Interactive Whiteboard Resources from the UK are organized by subject, age group, and category.  Age groups range from pre-school through high school.

 

Whiteboards as an instruction delivery medium

Friendly reminder GifIf you are considering using a whiteboard in instruction, remember that it comes with mixed reviews.  While it has prized features, consider that it's not the medium, but instructional methods that cause learning.

Read Dr. Patricia Deubel's article published in T.H.E. Journal: Interactive Whiteboards: Truths and Consequences (2010, August 4).

 

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References

Gojak, L. M. (2012, October 3). To flip or not to flip: That is not the question! NCTM Summing Up.  Retrieved from http://www.nctm.org/News-and-Calendar/Messages-from-the-President/Archive/Linda-M_-Gojak/To-Flip-or-Not-to-Flip_-That-Is-NOT-the-Question!/

Innovative Educator. (2010, May 10). The ten no nos of teaching with a projector or interactive whiteboard [blog post]. Retrieved from http://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/2010/05/ten-no-nos-of-teaching-with-projector.html

Saltman, D. (2011).  Flipping for beginners: Inside the new classroom craze.  Harvard Education Letter Tech Talk Series, 27(6).  Retrieved from http://www.hepg.org/hel/article/517

Stern, B. (2012, October 31). Five questions to ask before flipping a lesson.  Retrieved from https://www.edsurge.com/news/five-questions-to-ask-before-flipping-a-lesson

Walsh, K. (2013, November 3). Flipping the classroom facilitates active learning methods – experiential, project based, problem based, inquiry based, constructivism, etc. Retrieved from http://www.emergingedtech.com/2013/11/flipping-the-classroom-facilitates-these-5-active-learning-methods-and-much-more/

 

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Binoculars GifSee related topics:  Math Manipulatives and Standardized Test Preparation.