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Math Resources:
Contests, Competitions, Challenges, and Camps; Study Skills and Homework Help; Dictionaries, Glossaries, Math Encyclopedias

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Our collection of Math Resources has multiple pages designed for teaching within specific grade bands.  You'll also find valuable collections of support and enrichment resources that will benefit all learners.

Math Resources (Page 1): Elementary and Middle Levels: Basic Mathematics and Skills Development, plus apps for mobile devices

Math Resources (Page 2): Middle, Secondary, Post-Secondary Subject Specific Resources, including apps for mobile devices: Algebra and Pre-Algebra, Geometry, Statistics, Probability, Trigonometry, Precalculus and Calculus

Math Resources (Page 3): K-12 Supplementary Collections: Miscellaneous Math Collections; Practical Applications--Math in Careers, Daily Life, and Across the Curriculum; and Problem Solving

Arrow: You are hereMath Resources (Page 4): Enrichment and Extra Help

Math Resources (Page 5): Lesson Plans and Worksheets, Design and Manage Your Own Lesson Plans, and Publishers' Textbook Support Sites

Math Resources (Page 6): Resources for Podcasts and Vodcasts and for Whiteboards, including tips on using whiteboards

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Math Resources (Page 4)

 

Enrichment: Math Contests, Competitions, Challenges, and Camps

 

Winning the TrophyAmerican Mathematical Society has an entire section for high school students, which contains an extensive listing for summer camps and math contests and competitions.

American Regions Math League sponsors an annual national competition for high school students, although some exceptional middle school students attend each year.  The contest is held the weekend after Memorial Day.  Prior contest questions are posted with answers.  You will also find other national, state, and regional math contests.

Association of Computational and Mathematical Modeling (AoCMM) features an annual math modeling competition with cash prizes.  Per AoCMM's director, Yunkai Zhang, (email communication, July 27, 2016), students can participate in the competition at home or anywhere with internet access.  Students under the age of 20 can compete in teams of up to four individuals from any region or country. The team will be given two problems covering different fields of mathematical modeling, and it can choose to research on one or both of the two problems. At the end of the 14 days competition period, the team presents its solution in the form of a research paper. The registration fee is $5 per team, which includes a numerical score report reflecting the strengths and weaknesses of the paper. For $20, the team will receive detailed, professional feedback of the paper from experienced judges as well as a score report reflecting on the strengths and weaknesses of the paper.  Note: The 2016 competition will be from October 4th to October 18th.  Register at: http://aocmm.org/register-now.  AoCMM also features a series of free online tutorials that can be easily used by students with limited background in mathematics.

Conceptis Puzzles advance development of logic.  Puzzles are divided into three main lines: Picture Logic, Number Logic and Kids Logic.  Think of forms of Sudoku, which is also available.  Math puzzles vary in levels of difficulty.  For example, Calcudoku involves addition, subtraction, multiplication and division with a choice of one operation or various combinations of those operations and size of the square puzzle grid.  These can be very addictive, offering hours of mental stimulation.

Continental Math League has been in existence since 1980 and offers challenging math contents for students all over the U.S. in grades 2-9 and calculus.  Tests are paper/pencil and meets are held three times a year for grades 2-3, five times for grades 4-9, and four times for calculus students.  Each team per grade can have any number of students with exams taking about 30-40 minutes each.  There are awards.  A nominal fee is charged for participation.

Figure This! contains math challenges for middle school students and their families and is award winning, funded by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Education.  Each challenge describes the math involved, where the math is used in the real world, a hint to get started, and complete solutions.  There are a "Try This" section, additional related problems with answers, additional questions to think about, related math fun facts, and resources for further exploration.  The math index categorizes challenges according to strands: algebra, geometry, measurement, number, and statistics and probability.  Engaging cartoon characters illustrate features of at least 80 different challenges, such as Line Up, Beating Heart, Popcorn, and Don't Fall In.

Math Archives, maintained by the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, is a comprehensive source on various topics in mathematics, software for teaching K-12, and teaching materials (including lesson plans) ranging from K-12 to college calculus.  Materials also include contests and competitions at each level, and problem sets of the week or month.  There is an extensive list of professional societies related to mathematics.

MATHCOUNTS is a national math enrichment, coaching & competition program that promotes middle school mathematics. Schools select students to compete individually or as part of a team in one of the more than 500 written & oral competitions held nationwide. Top students advance to the state, & ultimately, national level. MATHCOUNTS also has a problem of the week and an extensive archive of problems posed each year, dating back to 1996. MATHCOUNTS at Rochester Institute of Technology competition for students with hearing loss is sponsored by the National Technical Institute for the Deaf.

MATHmodels.org has contests and problems on math modeling for high school and undergraduate learners. “Mathmodels is COMAP’s new modeling forum. On this site, students and faculty will find a wide range of interesting contemporary modeling problems. Teachers can assign problems. Students can choose to work on problems based on math topic and application area” (About MATHmodels section).  Note: This site has particular relevance, as math modeling is among mathematical practices included in the Common Core State Standards for mathematics.

Math Kangaroo in USA is "an international not-selective competition in mathematics for students in grades 1 through 12.  The competition takes the form of a multiple choice test.  Each participant is seen as a winner and receives recognition and gifts on the test day in March.  Those who achieve the top results are awarded in May.  The atmosphere of appreciation for the students' learning and the fun in each competition room across USA are the reasons why participants return year after year and bring their siblings and friends along" (Our History section).  There is a nominal charge per student.  Practice material is available.

Math League specializes in math contests, books, and computer software designed to stimulate interest and confidence in mathematics for students from the 4th grade through high school.  Whether or not you choose to participate in a contest, educators will find the Help Facility for Grades 4-8 of value.  This reference guide addresses math topics for grades 4-8, complete with examples, definitions, and explanations for whole numbers, decimals, using data and statistics, fractions, geometry, ratio and proportion, percent and probability, integers, measurement, introductory algebra, positive and negative numbers, and more.

Math Olympiads for grades 4-6 and 7-8 features five monthly contests (November-March) with five non-routine problems per contest, which can be completed at the participants' school.  Each team can have up to 35 students. Prizes are awarded at the end of the fifth contest.  There is also a problem of the month posted, along with the answer to the prior month's problem.

Mind Research Institute K-12 Game-a-thon is an annual math challenge in which students "design, build and share a game that features creative and unusual solutions to mathematical problems. Teams of one or more students, along with a teacher or parent in a coordinator role, can invent card games, board games, apps, outdoor games or anything else that addresses a mathematical topic ranging from counting to irrational numbers to measurement to modeling."  The challenge begins February 1 with entries due July 15.  Winners are announced in August and top entries are invited to showcase their work in September in a Math Fair (location and date TBA).

Mathschallenge.net contains a variety of puzzles and challenges suitable for grades 6-12, and adults. Problems are divided into appropriate levels: junior, senior, and advanced. There is a section for recreational mathematics dealing with number, code breaking, and geometry. Project Euler contains a series of challenging mathematical/computer programming problems.

Moody's Mega Math Challenge (M3Challenge) is an applied mathematics competition for high school students. Winners receive scholarships totaling thousands of dollars for continuing education. The contest is sponsored by the Moody Foundation and SIAM (Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics). For additional information, also see the YouTube video, accessed from the site.

National Association of Math Circles is for students.  According to the Association, "Mathematical Circles are a form of education enrichment and outreach that bring mathematicians and mathematical scientists into direct contact with pre-college students. These students, and sometimes their teachers, meet with mathematical professionals in an informal setting, after school or on weekends, to work on interesting problems or topics in mathematics. The goal is to get the students excited about the mathematics, giving them a setting that encourages them to become passionate about mathematics" (Introduction to Math Circles section).  You'll find locations near you, math circle problem collections, resources in the math circles community, and information on how to start your own math circle.  Similarly, middle school teachers can take advantage of the Math Teachers’ Circle Network from the American Institute of Mathematics.  Their math circles throughout the United States work to foster an enjoyment of mathematics among middle school math teachers within a culture of problem solving.

Problem of the Week math contest from Columbus State University in Georgia

Ole Miss Math Challenge is hosted by the University of Mississippi.  It was originally started by David Rock and Doug Brumbaugh as the online Problem of the Week contest in 1996 at the University of Central Florida.  You can submit your answer, and if correct, your name can be posted at the site and you can win a T-shirt.  These are very engaging problems promoting interest in math at all age levels.  Problems from other sections (Algebra in Action, Middle School Madness, and Elementary Brain Teaser) are geared to specific audiences--highly recommended.

Online Math League features three competitions each year with each contest open for a month to accommodate flexible scheduling for participation.  Contests range in levels for grades 2 through algebra and meet state and national standards.  Scores are immediately posted online and students can compete with others from around the world.  Team and individual awards are given.  There is an interactive online practice area with multiple practice tests at each level with feedback for incorrect answers and opportunity to try problems again.  A nominal fee is attached for an individual and student teams.

Platonic Realms delivers fresh math humor, quotes, historical notes, and a mathematical challenge problem every day.  Each day the solution from the previous day's challenge problem is made available.

Problems of the Week (PoW):  The Math Forum at NCTM provides weekly challenging problems for students in grades 3-12 in six categories: elementary, middle, algebra, geometry, discrete mathematics, and trigonometry/calculus.  Each category also contains a schedule for upcoming problems, and an archive to past problems and solutions.  Problem-solving and communicating math are key elements to all problems.  An information page and PoW discussion area are provided for teacher support. The Math Forum also provides a Technology Problem of the Week and Financial Education Problems of the Week for each grade level 1-12.  The alignment of these financial problems to the Common Core standards is included.  Also see Ken-Ken.  Ken-Ken is free and has a puzzle format similar to Sudoku, only with numbers.  You can choose the math operation(s) for each puzzle and level of difficulty.

SEED (Schlumberger Excellence in Educational Development, Inc.) Math Puzzles, featured under Science, address number sense, arithmetic, probability, algebraic thinking; geometry, spatial reasoning, and visualization; topology, logic, combinatorics, and miscellaneous topics.  These are appropriate for middle school and above.

USA Mathematical Talent Search (USAMTS) is a free mathematics competition open to all United States middle and high school students.  Students can take up to a month to solve the problems and must submit their justifications.  According to USAMTS, "Problems range in difficulty from being within the reach of most high school students to challenging the best students in the nation. Students may use any materials - books, calculators, computers - but all the work must be their own. The USAMTS is run on the honor system."  There are prizes.

Word Problems for Kids, from St. Francis Xavier University, is for teachers and students in grades 5-12.  Problems, which were selected to help develop problem-solving skills, have been adapted from the Canadian Mathematics Competitions and are divided by grade level. Hints and answers are included.  Select a problem of the week to add to your curriculum.

 

Are you interested in a math camp or summer program in your area?

American Mathematical Society maintains a list of summer math camps and programs for high school students.

Cogito.org maintained by Johns Hopkins University Center for Talented Youth has an extensive list of summer programs (elementary, middle, and high school) throughout the U.S. and internationally in math and other academic areas.

Math Forum maintains an annotated list of math camps and summer programs, some just for girls. States include California, Colorado, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, Ohio, Texas, and Washington, for example.

MySummerCamps.com has an extensive list of math camps and other academic and pre-college camps in several states.

 

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Study Skills, Homework Help, and Parent Involvement

 

How to Learn Math: For Students, Teachers, Parents

How to Learn Math: StudentsDr. Jo Boaler of Stanford University has a short, free course at youcubed.org called "How to Learn Math" for any student in all levels of mathematics.  There are six short lessons about 10 to 20 minutes each.  You'll get some key information on the brain and learning, and effective strategies for learning math.  Concepts include overcoming myths about math, math and mindset, mistakes and speed; number flexibility, math reasoning, and connections; number patterns and representations; and math in life, nature, and work.  The course also features videos of math in action.

There's also a short course on how to learn math for teachers and parents; however, this one is not free.  It includes an interactive environment to explore new research on math teaching and student mindsets.  You'll learn about new pedagogical strategies, high quality math tasks, questioning to promote understanding, messages to give students, and inspirational messages from thought leaders in education.

Study Skills

Daniel Willingham (2014) noted that typically learners use four study strategies.  First, they read a chapter trying to understand individual sentences.  Second, learners highlight what they perceive as important to remember.  Third, they don't look at a chapter again until a day or two before a test.  Fourth, to prepare for a test, they reread the chapter, focusing on previously highlighted content.  However, those strategies do not work for long term retention of content.  Rereading is a relatively weak strategy to boost memory, given that there are other more useful study techniques to support learning, which are supported by research.  Willingham identified the following four good ways to learn.

Students: Do you need help with studying?

effectivestudy.org contains some valuable tips and articles on study skills, memorization and thinking, productivity and time management, reading, test taking, and writing.

howtostudy.org contains a how to study model and resources for study skills, how to study, and how to write within several subject areas.

Study Guides and Strategies contains several sections: study skills, preparing for tests, taking tests; improving research, project management, reading, writing, science, and math skills.

Homework Help

Homework books on student's back gifStudents: Do you need help with homework or solving problems?  Sometimes seeing the steps in a solution to a problem can also help you solve similar problems.  Do you need a video tutorial to help learn a concept or refresh your memory?

Cosmeo.com is Discovery Channel's homework help for students in grades 2-12.  The service has a monthly fee, but free trials are available.  There is also a section called Math Made Easy (K-12) with interactive math tools to help solve problems, and get step-by-step solutions in topics up to advanced math for high school.

CyMath.com provides step-by-step solutions to problems involving algebra and both differential and integral calculus.  For example, among algebra topics are solutions to factoring, partial fractions, polynomial division, equation solving, quadratic equations, logarithmic equations, and systems of equations.  You can also work with trig functions,  and expand and simplify expressions.

Dweeber.com is a free social website primarily for learners aged 13 and up.  Its purpose is to help them get homework done faster by working with their school friends online. There's an interactive whiteboard for working together to solve problems, or to create diagrams or drawings. You can set up virtual group study sessions using chat and create a SMART profile to understand your own learning strengths and talents, and to better connect you with those who think and learn as you do.  There is a section for resources that allows students to share relevant websites that help with assignments for particular subjects. Plus, teachers can use the site for their classrooms or join in a chat with groups for additional learning support.

FactMonster.com is an award winning site that features an atlas, almanac, dictionary, encyclopedia, and individualized homework help.  Students can get facts on a range of subjects including math, the world and news, U.S., science, sports, people, and more.  There are games and quizzes also.  Among press releases is the March 2001 recognition in the NCTM News Bulletin, WebBytes, which highlighted the site as a reference source.

Free Math Help has lessons for algebra, geometry, trig, calculus, and some other subjects/topics.  Enter your math problem and get step-by-step help for the solution.  The site also provides text and video lessons to accompany many topics in those subjects.

Hotmath provides 24/7 help with homework in your pre-algebra, algebra 1 or 2, geometry, precalculus or calculus course.  Choose your text from the major publishers, get hints and step-by-step tutorials for odd-numbered problems shown on your selected page.

HOT: Mathway is a free online problem solver for basic math, pre-algebra, algebra, trigonometry, precalculus, calculus, statistics, finite math, linear algebra.  There is graphing capability, and also a glossary of key math terms.

Studygeek.org provides free online math homework help from tutors who have at least a master's or Ph.D. degree.  You can also study from lessons developed by experienced tutors.  The focus is on algebra, geometry, statistics, trigonometry, and calculus.  There are some math games and a section with math vocabulary.  A section of "math solvers" includes online calculators for solving quadratic and linear equations, using the distributive property, absolute value, exponents, finding the greatest common factor, matrix multiplication, and finding domain and range of a function.

QuickMath, powered by Mathematica, is an automatic problem-solving site developed by Dr. B. Langton of Sydney, Australia.  Secondary and college students and their instructors will benefit from the quick solutions to problems encountered with algebra, equations, inequalities, calculus (differentiation and integration), number concepts, and matrices.  Graphing appearance can be user-modified.  The only thing you will need to know to use the free service is how to enter expressions and equations.  Highly recommended.

Tutor.com is not free (price is noted at the website), but it connects students to a professional tutor the moment they need help. Tutors are available 24/7 for one-to-one instructional support in math, science, English, and social studies.  Tutoring is online in real time using interactive whiteboards and chat features.

WatchKnowLearn.org contains a database of free educational videos organized for students ages 3 to 18, so that they can get extra "instant tutoring" on almost any topic taught when they need it.  There are multiple content areas, including about 1000 videos in mathematics and over 100 on standardized test skills and math study skills.  The project's executive director is Larry Sanger, who co-founded Wikipedia.  Its Advisory Committee contains recognized leaders in education.

Webmath is composed of many math "fill-in-forms" into which you can type the math problem you're working on. Linked to these forms is a powerful set of math-solvers, that can instantly analyze your problem, and when possible, provide you with a step-by-step solution.  Categories include Math for Everyone, General Math, K-8 Math, Algebra, Plots & Geometry, Trig & Calculus, and Other Stuff.

Wolfram|Alpha  Enter a question requiring a factual answer or calculation, including one in which graphing is involved, and Wolfram|Alpha uses its built-in algorithms and a growing collection of data to compute the answer.  This resource can be used by anyone, including K-20 learners, educators in the classroom, other professionals, and beyond.  Multiple topics are included: math, engineering, physics, places and geography, dates and times, money and finance, units and measures, chemistry, health and medicine, foods and nutrition, colors, music, and much more.  This is not a search engine, but Wolfram|Alpha has sidebar links for doing web searches.  Also see Wolfram|Alpha for iPhone and iPad.

WyzAnt Math Help Sections are free and cover multiple areas: elementary math, algebra, geometry, precalculus, calculus, and statistics and probability.  You'll find informative descriptions, interactive examples, and sample problems.  The site also features tutoring, but this latter service is not free.

Parent Involvement

Parents: Do you want to help your children learn mathematics and succeed in school?

The U.S. Department of Education has a booklet, Helping Your Child Learn Mathematics with fun activities that parents can use with children from preschool age through grade 5 to strengthen their math skills and build strong positive attitudes toward math.  You'll find activities for the home, the grocery store, and for when you are "on the go."

How to Help Your Kids Succeed in School by K5Learning is a free e-book on this topic.  It contains practical advice and suggests activities that parents can use with their children who are in preschool to grade 5.

The Council of the Great City Schools produced Parent Roadmaps to the Common Core Standards- Mathematics in 2012 and 2013 for grades K-8 and high school to help provide guidance to parents about what their children will be learning and how they can support that learning. The publications also include three-year snapshots showing how selected standards progress from year to year so that students will be college and career ready upon their graduation from high school.

 

Teachers: You need to "keep parents informed about the purpose of the [Common Core] standards and engaged in their children’s math education" (Bay-Williams, Duffett, & Griffith, 2016, p. 44).

To help parents, "make homework assignments as straightforward and comprehensible as possible, so that parents can understand them. More important than teaching a method and practicing a method (especially one not familiar to families), is ensuring that a student selects the method that makes sense to her and from which she can efficiently and accurately reach a solution. Parents are then able to support the student with methods they know. If the goal of the homework is to provide practice with a new method, then teachers should support families by sending home worked examples of new methods or providing online links that explain the method, among other strategies" (Bay-Williams, Duffett, & Griffith, 2016, p. 44).

Teachers: Don't make assumptions about a child's home environment when assigning homework.

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Teachers are always concerned about missed assignments, particularly in math where homework is often assigned daily. Cathy Vatterott (2009) advised:

  • Do not assume the child has a quiet place to do homework.
  • Do not assume the child has a parent home in the evening.
  • Do not assume the child's parents speak and read English.
  • Do not assume the family has money for school supplies.
  • Do not assume the child has access to materials such as paper, a pencil sharpener, scissors, glue, magazines, or a calculator.
  • Do not assume the child has access to a computer or the Internet. (p. 40)

While some students choose not to do their homework, for others there might be understandable reasons why they don't always do it.  Home circumstances, as noted by Vatterott (2009), might play a role.  Younger children and teens might have considerable family related responsibilities, jobs, extensive extra curricular activities, and so on.

ZAP (Zeroes Aren't Permitted) those zeroes on homework.

Giving zeroes for missing homework assignments is easy to do.  An alternative of assigning 50% in the grade book instead of "0" might help keep students from giving up, but that solution does not measure learning, nor lead to it.

Trying to come up with an alternative solution to the problem of zeroes that works is more time consuming, but in this age of accountability, the effort is worth it.  Consider reading Teaching Heroes: Toss the Zeroes by Cara Bafile (2008) at Education World.  Bafile noted three alternatives and schools that use them:

  • The Working Lunch Period/Recess
  • Before or after school sessions; parent calls
  • Report cards differentiating between work behaviors and academic ability
  • An afterschool once per week "no zeroes detention" not considered as punitive, rather a place to complete assignments with teacher assistance.

 

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Dictionaries, Glossaries, Reference Sheets, and Math Encyclopedias

 

Studying late at night GifStudents, Parents: Are you having difficulty with a particular math term or idea?  If so, check out these resources:

A Maths Dictionary for Kids by Jenny Eather is an attention-getting, animated collection of over 600 terms found in K-8 math.  Definitions with examples and interactive activities reinforce concepts.  Jenny Eather also has a Math Charts free app and a deluxe version of this app ($4.99) for iPhone and iPad, both available in iTunes.

Coolmath's Online Math Dictionary

eCalc Math Help Reference Sheets for algebra, geometry, trigonometry (definitions, laws, identities), and calculus (derivatives, limits, integrals).  There are six reference sheets in all with key definitions, properties, operations, and formulas in each subject, all in one file.

Glencoe McGraw-Hill Math eGlossary for grades 6-12.  Select your grade level and then find the term you need.  There is also a section for math formulas.

Glossary of Mathematical Terms for Parents and Teachers is a 57 page document of math terms in both English and Spanish with illustrations to accompany many of the terms, available from the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction.

LearnAlberta: Mathematics Glossary (Canada) has definitions for mathematical terms for grades 1 through 12. The terms are organized by grade and alphabetically. Many definitions provide interactive animations and examples.

Math.com Glossary

Math Is Fun LogoMath Is Fun Illustrated Mathematics Dictionary contains over 700 math definitions, some of which are also animated.

Mathematics Dictionary & Glossary is primarily for secondary and early tertiary students who are studying mathematics or math-related subjects. It contains over 2000 defined words, terms and concepts, all of which are cross-referenced with live linking.  These have been written by ITS Tutorial School (Hong Kong) and appropriately edited.

HOT for CCSS: Mathematics Glossary by Ron Blond includes definitions for math vocabulary with illustrations and demonstration applets.  Vocabulary is divided into sections for grades 1-3, 4-6, 7-9, and 10-12.  Java is required to view.

Mathwords.com: "This website is designed for math students who need an easy-to-use, easy-to-understand math resource all in one place. It is a comprehensive listing of formulas and definitions from Algebra I to Calculus. The explanations are readable for average math students, and over a thousand illustrations and examples are provided," according to developer Bruce Simmons, who teaches math.

MathWorld is a comprehensive and interactive mathematics encyclopedia for students (grades 7-12, post-secondary), educators, math enthusiasts, and researchers.  This award winning site, hosted by Wolfram Research, Inc., makers of Mathematica, has been assembled over the past decade by E. Weisstein with assistance from the mathematics and internet communities.  Subjects indexed include algebra, applied math, calculus and analysis, discrete math, foundations of math, geometry, history and terminology, number theory, probability and statistics, recreational math, and topology.  Explanations include mathematical exposition and illustrative examples.

Multimedia Math Glossary from Harcourt School Publishers is a dictionary of mathematical terms associated with each grade level K-6.  Each term is accompanied by a definition, example, and audio.  Animation is included.

Platonic Realms for secondary and post-secondary students features a "must-see" interactive mathematics encyclopedia, which can be browsed at elementary and advanced levels.  Topics include basic mathematics, algebra, analysis, biography, calculus, discrete math, history, economics, geometry, graph theory, number theory, statistics, trigonometry, and math quotes.

Visual Mathematics Dictionary includes math vocabulary available by grades K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and K-12.

Wolfram Math World

 

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References

Bafile, C. (2008, August 18). Teaching heroes: Toss the zeroes.  Education World. Retrieved from http://www.educationworld.com/a_admin/admin/admin531.shtml 

Bay-Williams, J., Duffett, A., & Griffith, D. (2016, June). Common core math in the K-8 classroom: Results from a national teacher survey. Washington, D.C.: Thomas B. Fordham Institute. Retrieved from http://edexcellence.net/publications/common-core-math-in-the-k-8-classroom-results-from-a-national-teacher-survey

Vatterott, C. (2009). Rethinking homework: Best practices that support diverse needs. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

Willingham, D. (2014). Strategies that make learning last. Educational Leadership, 72(2), 10-15.  Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/oct14/vol72/num02/Strategies-That-Make-Learning-Last.aspx

 

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Binoculars GifSee related topics:  Math Manipulatives and Standardized Test Preparation.